ZAMBIA


Formerly called Northern Rhodesia as an integral part of Cecil Rhodes’ Cape to Cairo vision, Zambia is in fact steeped in history dating all the way back to the African Stone Age. However, in many ways the famous Scottish missionary David Livingstone put the country on the European map as he came to the shores of Lake Tanganyika in search of the source of the Nile in the early 19th century. Whilst Zambia is now one of Africa’s most urbanised countries, much of the country remains wild, underdeveloped and unspoilt, with a great percentage of land allocated by the government to conservation projects, national parks and game management areas. Many of these parks are home to incredible numbers of Africa’s most-feted wild mammals and extraordinary birdlife.

Zambia’s remaining open rural areas are, for the most part, rich and fertile, with Zambia’s consistently warm tropical climate made less oppressive by the altitude of many parts of the country. One of the most water rich countries in Africa, Zambia has 5 vast lakes, 3 major rivers, 17 waterfalls and various wetland areas. .

Many of Zambia’s 72 ethnic groups still inhabit these rural areas, relying on subsistence farming to get by.

Zambia is one of the fastest growing economies on the African continent and tourism is crucial to the country’s on-going development. first-hand their rich cultural heritage. But perhaps most of all, Botswana’s greatest gift is its ability to put us in touch with our natural selves. It offers that vital link so keenly felt by inhabitants of the developed world, a pervasive void we feel but often cannot name – our connectedness with Nature and the astonishing diversity of plants and animals to be explored.


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South Luangwa National Park

Experts have dubbed South Luangwa to be one of the greatest wildlife sanctuaries in the world, and not without reason. The concentration of animals around the Luangwa River, and its oxbow lagoons, is among the most intense in Africa.


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North Luangwa National Park

This remote tract of land, covering 4636 square kilometres, offers one of the finest wilderness experiences in Zambia, if not Africa itself. It is not open to the public and there are no permanent lodges there. Access is with one of the few safari operators granted permission to conduct walking safaris.

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Lower Zambezi National Park

This Park is still relatively undeveloped, it’s beauty lying in it’s wilderness state. The diversity of animals is not as wide as the other big parks, but the opportunities to get close to game wandering in and out of the Zambezi channels are spectacular.

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Kafue National Park

Found in the centre of western Zambia, Kafue National Park is the oldest and largest of Zambia’s national parks. It covers a massive 22,400 km2.



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Liuwa Plains National Park

This remote park in the far west is pristine wilderness, which, to the ardent bush-lover, is its biggest attraction, and the rewards are great indeed.


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The Zambezi River

he Zambezi is Africa’s fourth largest River system, after the Nile, Zaire and Niger Rivers. It runs through six countries on it’s journey from central Africa to the Indian Ocean.

Ilkurot Primary & Nursery School is located approximately 30km north of Arusha, Tanzania in a Maasai village called Ilkurot (meaning "dusty place").
From 2008, we have begun to assist in Esilalei, a Maasai village along the shores of Lake Manyara. Together with Into Africa UK and Belafrica (Europe), we have built their first classroom - a Nursery school for 120 students.
Le Manyatta & Matimu Primary Schools are located approximately 20km north of Arusha, Tanzania in a Maasai village called Le Manyatta (meaning 'protected place' in the Maa language). They are schools that was built approximately thirty years ago by the Tanzanian government, beginning as 3 mud classrooms.
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